Our favourite photos from Uganda 2019.

Posted by Digby AytonMarch 5, 2020

In late 2019 Darcy, Monica, Hamish & Bailey travelled to Uganda to talk with our coffee farmers and partners on Mt Elgon. Thanks to our friends at Zukuka Bora, Kyagalanyi, Agri-Evolve and ECOTRUST for being amazing hosts. Bailey Chappel took photos along the way, these are our favourites.

Kampala. After 50 hours of travel the team discusses how best to use the next two weeks.
Kua coffee goes through multiple stages of sorting prior to shipment to Sydney.
Most coffee husk is captured for re-use as fuel in large drying ovens, but storage facilities are still dusty places. Here, a young worker lifts a bag of freshly milled green coffee, with a mask to filter the air.
Ugandan streetscape, on the road to Ksinga. 
Up in the Zukuka Bora sorting station there is a deep-rooted emphasis on quality. Only the reddest of coffee cherries are accepted, meaning better coffee in Sydney and higher margins for smallholder farming families.
On Mt Elgon farmers are paid in cash, immediately. All transactions are scribbled in this exercise book and logged digitally at the end of each buying day. 
Monica, Hamish and Darcy hold another impromptu discussion in the back of a rickety 4 x 4.
Konaeka Richard, a coffee farmer scratches his ear. Richard’s family has been home-processing coffee for generations. Just as his grandparents were coffee farmers, he expects his grandchildren to follow in his footsteps. His son, Gimei Paul, is studying agriculture at university in Kampala. 
A young croton tree grows on the Wanale mountainside. This tree was planted in partnership with ECOTRUST, our partners working for climate resistance and the restoration of native ecosystems on the ground.
Alongside traditional photo and video, Kua captured hours of virtual reality footage. The 360 degree camera served as a constant source of entertainment for inquisitive locals. 
Paul walking through his forest. Through the Trees for Global Benefit program, he utilises a segment of his farm to plant native trees. Not only do these sequester carbon, but Paul receives supplementary income through the sale of voluntary carbon credits to an international market.
Monica’s note book. Red with Mt Elgon mud.
Agri-Evolve's storage house in the far west of Uganda. This facility is working with hundreds of farmers to transform an undervalued crop to a sought after specialty product. Kua will use this natural bean to sweeten its blend. 
Darcy WFW (working from waterfall).
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